Women's Shoes

Men's Shoes

Platform soles, which had been introduced for women’s wear in the sixties, were accepted into men’s fashion by 1972. By 1975, this trend had continued to add wedges to the male wardrobe. This fashion, however, was short lived. By 1978, platform and wedge

Manufacture and Materials

Platform

Dress

From the natural, earthy appearances donned by the hippies in the sixties, the seventies take a sharp contrast. Unnatural colours, shapes and fabrics were utilised to rebel against the rebellion. The eclectic variety in costume extended not only to the youth, but also to conservative, formal functions. Blue jeans and leather jackets could be seen at the theatre, along side the conservative three-piece suits.

The Seventies

When the Vietnam War wound down in the early 1970’s, financial recession and energy shortages had emerged. Confrontation and revolt receded, and young people began to turn to private goals and a concern for self. Interest in the occult demonstrated the escapism that was a reaction to the explosive sixties.

Women's Shoes

Like the men of this period, women’s shoes are hard to classify into a distinct look. The conservative woman clung to the thin-heeled stiletto, though in a shorter version than in the fifties.

Men's Shoes

Men’s shoes offered an enormous variety of colours and styles during this decade. Though the conservative set stuck to

Manufacture and Materials

The shoes of this period vary greatly depending on which social group one focuses on. The hippies had their own version of fashion, which can best be described as anti-fashion. As fast as designers copied the styles, they had already changed.

The fashion designers were not totally outflanked. With the more conservative groups haute couture was still appealing. The most copied shoe of the time was Roger Vivier’s pilgrim pump with silver buckles.

Dress

In the 1960’s, the centre of the fashion world moved from Paris to London, and it was the new street style, rather than haute couture, that led fashion. The youthful rebellion that took place during this decade was strongly represented by dress. The chic look of the 1960’s was a far cry from the grey flannel suit of the decade before. The youth were barefoot, ragged, and primitive one day, and the next decked out in colourful boots, leathers, blouses, and scarves representing Gypsy attire.

The Sixties

From the complacent culture of the United States in the 1950’s with its images of the man in the grey flannel suit, suburban living, Cold War politics, and Eisenhower conservatism, arose a new feeling under the idealistic leadership of John F. Kennedy. Suddenly, there was a new feeling of commitment to human concerns. This was reflected in the founding of the Peace Corps, the opening of the civil rights movement, and the commitment of the nation to the defence of freedom in the world.